Nursing Home Information

Special kudos to the Reading Eagle on its recent series on nursing homes – in particular the editorial We Must Demand Better from Nursing Homes, Regulators, published on December 11, 2016. For those of us who work hard to hold nursing home corporations accountable when seniors are neglected, abused, seriously injured, or die, this series of articles is a vindication.

Continue Reading

According to Medicare fraud reports by the U.S. Department of Human Health and Services (HHS), the U.S. Department of Justice’s Medicare Fraud Strike Force team has investigated $7 billion in fraudulent billing since 2007 and prosecuted over 2400 medical professionals and administrators. Part of that amount comes from nursing homes that bill for unnecessary services or for services that have not been provided to the residents that depend on them.

And that fraudulent activity harms nursing home residents as well as our government’s bottom line.


Continue Reading

Recently, the August 2015 Special Focus Facility List was published by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The CMS regularly visits nursing homes to assure that they are administering the quality of care that Medicare and Medicaid require. With these regular visits, the CMS will identify any deficiencies in the quality of care

When deciding whether to place a loved-one into a nursing home, families attempt to determine whether the nursing home is capable of providing the necessary quality care. Most families visit the nursing home, as well as check the U.S. government’s Nursing Home Compare tool at Medicare.gov.

Despite their efforts, some nursing homes have purposefully misrepresented

In nursing-home neglect and abuse cases, the victims of the nursing-home negligence or abuse often suffer from some form of dementia, including Alzheimer’s, which is a specific type of dementia that accounts for 60 to 80 percent of dementia cases.

Alzheimer’s is a progressing disease. That means that it worsens over time, causing cognitive

In New Jersey, Assisted Living encompasses providing various coordinated supportive personal and health services, available 24 hours per day, to residents who need those services. Its purpose is to promote resident self-direction and participation in decisions, with an emphasis on independence, individuality, privacy, dignity, and homelike surroundings.

And thus, corporations that operate Assisted Living Facilities (ALF) must provide, at a minimum, services for:

  • Nursing
  • Recreation
  • Medical Transportation
  • Personal Care
  • Social Work
  • Activities
  • Housekeeping
  • Dining
  • Pharmacy

Indeed, ALFs and our nursing-home lawyers know that potential residents have the right to live in an ALF that does not admit more residents than it can safely accommodate while providing those services and other care. And for persons who currently live in an ALF, the corporations operating the ALFs know that those residents have the right to receive care and services at a level that addresses the residents’ changing physical and psychosocial status.


Continue Reading

Harborview, a defendant in a case we took to trial last year, is back in the news.  During the trial, the ownership and management spoke of the facility in glowing terms – terms that were contradicted by state inspections and other testimony.  The article recounts rodent problems – and even chronicles a resident that bought