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Grane Healthcare Brought to Task for Understaffing

Posted in News, Nursing Home Fraud

It was recently reported by ABC27 News that the Pennsylvania Attorney General Office has brought a lawsuit against Grane Healthcare and their facilities individually for understaffing and not providing basic services to its residents.

More troubling is the fact that the state alleges that “Grane’s business practices are deceptive and misleading because it advertises that it strives for a very high staff-to-patient ratio.”

After doing nursing home neglect and abuse claims day in and day out, it is encouraging to see state agencies stepping up and holding these facilities to task as well.

Traditional Treatment for UTIs in Doubt

Posted in Elder Issues

Urinary Tract Infections (UTI) can be a serious problem for the elderly in nursing homes. Those afflicted with UTIs can have delusions, dementia-like symptoms, and will feel the urge to urinate all the time. This can be a recipe for disaster for a person that requires help to get to the bathroom. Many serious and fatal falls occur because residents with UTIs will constantly feel like they need to get to the bathroom, forget to use the call bell, and will get up on their own.

Additionally, if UTIs are not treated they can lead to sepsis and death.

One of the historically typical and easiest solutions to avoid UTIs was to just drink cranberry juice. Unfortunately, a new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association and reported by KFOR places this common wisdom into doubt.

Although drinking cranberry juice was not discouraged, the study showed taking cranberry capsules (pills with cranberry extract) had a “limited potential effect.”

Families know their loved ones best, and many times it is families that diagnose UTIs and not a facility. Watch for signs of increased urination, delusions or odd behavior, fever, or general lethargy. With quick treatment, most UTIs clear up, but if they go untreated they can be lethal.

Patient Dumping and the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA)

Posted in Levels of Care

During much of the 20th century, hospitals did not have a duty to treat patients who entered emergency departments. Without any given reason, they could refuse to treat certain patients. The practice of “patient dumping” arose from that lack of duty.

Patient dumping refers to situations when hospitals deny emergency medical screening and stabilization services. It also refers to instances when a hospital transfers an individual to another hospital after discovering that the individual does not have insurance or a means to pay for treatment.

To correct that wrong and in an effort to ensure that individuals received needed emergency care, in 1986 Congress enacted EMTALA, which was designed to protect all individuals seeking evaluation or treatment at hospital emergency departments that participate in Medicare. Continue Reading

Several Philly Area Non-Profit Nursing Homes Sold to For-Profit Companies

Posted in Levels of Care, Protecting Your Rights

I was recently speaking with someone about a woman who worked for a non-profit nursing home for many years. She liked it there and the facility provided good care. Then the facility was sold to a for-profit corporation. Overnight, staff hours were cut, pay was cut, and care declined. The person I was speaking with could not believe this could happen–I was not surprised as sadly I’ve seen this occur many times.

If an administrator at a non-profit tells her board of directors she made a little money that year and gave great care, she’s applauded. However, if that same administrator tells the same thing to a for-profit board, she’s getting fired. The replacement knows that staffing is the biggest expense and that’s where you will see the cuts.

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New Study Shows Common Medications Cause Cognitive Problems in Elderly

Posted in Elder Issues, Medication

I’ve written before about how important it is to know what prescription medications are being administered in nursing homes and long term rehab facilities. Many do not have good efficacy, may be dangerous, or may cause problems when mixed with other medications. A new study indicates it is now also important to find out what over the counter (OTC) medications are being given.

The study, reported in the Observer, showed a link between certain medications in the class called anticholinergics and cognitive impairment in the elderly. OTC medications in this class include Dimetapp, Dramamine, Benadryl, and Unisom. This class of medications also includes the prescription medications Toviaz, Paxil and Seroquel. In the study, people using these types of medicines exhibited reduced brain function and increased brain atrophy. Specifically, the study showed that use of these meds affected immediate memory recall and cognition, and may also induce cell death.

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How Nursing Home Staff Can Help Prevent Medicare Fraud

Posted in Nursing Home Fraud, Nursing Home Information

According to Medicare fraud reports by the U.S. Department of Human Health and Services (HHS), the U.S. Department of Justice’s Medicare Fraud Strike Force team has investigated $7 billion in fraudulent billing since 2007 and prosecuted over 2400 medical professionals and administrators. Part of that amount comes from nursing homes that bill for unnecessary services or for services that have not been provided to the residents that depend on them.

And that fraudulent activity harms nursing home residents as well as our government’s bottom line.

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Forced Pre-Dispute Arbitration Gets Federal Attention

Posted in Legislation, Legislation Watch, News

Throughout the country, trusting families are signing nursing home, rehab, and assisted living admission paperwork for someone they care deeply about. These documents are technical, long, and complicated. Hidden in many of these agreements is language that significantly curtails a family’s ability to hold a facility accountable if something terrible happens – including rape, assault, neglect, and death. This language is called “pre-dispute” or “forced” arbitration language.

Pre-dispute forced arbitration is where a person agrees to give up their right to sue in court if an injury or death happens. To be clear, your loved one’s admission to the facility cannot be denied if you don’t agree to arbitration and you get absolutely, 100%, nothing in exchange for agreeing to pre-dispute arbitration.

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New Jersey Looks to Improve Staffing Ratios

Posted in Elder Issues, Legislation, Levels of Care, News

Often, many of the problems that occur in nursing homes are a direct result of terribly insufficient staffing. This knowledge is born out in studies that show a direct correlation between staffing ratios and quality of care.

Despite all of this clear evidence, many facilities only meet the bare minimum hours required under state regulation. Some aides have told me the ratio on their day shift at a nursing home was as high as 1 aide to 14 residents. For those unaware, aides are the people who feed, bathe, and transfer residents, and they are also responsible turning and repositioning any residents who are at risk for developing bed sores. Having only 1 person in charge of caring for 14 patients at the same time is a catastrophe waiting to happen.

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Large Nursing Home Chain, Kindred, Caught Defrauding Medicare

Posted in News, Nursing Home Information

As I’ve written before, the real drivers of healthcare costs are not lawsuits, which studies by Johns Hopkins Medicine found are less than 1% of healthcare costs. The big costs are a result of fraud.

Kindred Healthcare, a large chain of nursing homes, will pay $125 million to settle allegations that it billed Medicare for therapy that was either unnecessary or not provided.

The case was brought forward by two whistleblowers – employees of Kindred who knew that what their company was doing was not right.  You can read a full account of the case as reported by the Boston Globe.

Momentum Builds Against Use of Predispute Arbitration Clauses in Long-Term Care Admission Agreements

Posted in Publications

Stark & Stark Associate Eric D. Dakhari, member of the Nursing Home Litigation Group, authored the article Momentum Builds Against Use of Predispute Arbitration Clauses in Long-Term Care Admission Agreements, which was published on NJ.com on November 20, 2015.

The article explains one of the dangers sometimes hidden inside nursing home admission statements: predispute binding-arbitration clauses. This is so dangerous because it allows nursing-home corporations to sidestep the civil-justice system if families attempt to file lawsuits against substandard care. This has the double effect of not only preventing these claims from being litigated in New Jersey Superior Court, but also preventing any of these records from being made public and readily accessible.

Arbitration clauses are often written in complicated legal jargon that the average person wouldn’t typically recognize, and they’re typically buried in admission papers. The resident and their family are in the midst of an extremely emotional and delicate decision, so the last thing on their mind is how they would want to handle a hypothetical legal dispute that may or may not occur in the future.

Mr. Dakhari adds, “Momentum is continuing to build for the fight to rid our society of predispute arbitration clauses in long-term care agreements. Before you sign an admission agreement for yourself or your loved one, you are urged to have it reviewed by experienced legal counsel.”

To read the full article, please click here.